Perseids Meteor Shower peaking August 11-13, 2013 - exposure time?

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The Perseids meteor shower is supposed to peak at the mornings of Augsut 11-13.  From what I understand the best "quantity" viewing is supposedly after midnight and on until predawn and a couple of hours after sundown is the better viewing for larger meteors.  I figure I'll try to start looking on the evening of the 10th and for the next three nights.

My little humble A1200 is loaded with CHDK and waterwingz latest modification of lecshoot.lua (Long exposure continuous shooting script).

A couple of rookie questions...

My A1200 is prone to camea noise so I'll have the red dots on the screen...I'm not sure about using darkframes or if it would be worth bothering with...would it?...and would it work.

I've seen it stated that anything over 25 seconds will cause a 'blur' or 'pear shape' image to form, so I will shoot at 25 for less seconds.  Since long exposures cause more camera noise (my A1200 is no exception) and also amp glow, would reducing the exposure time down to 20 seconds help either of these two problems or would it be better to stick with the 25 second exposure to get bright star images and accept the red dots of camera noise? 

I'm not sure about using darkframes and whether it would be worth bothering with...and would it even work in a timelapse of a moving starfield (versus star trail) photography?

Thanks,
Ed

Re: Perseids Meteor Shower peaking August 11-13, 2013 - exposure time?
« Reply #1 on: 03 / August / 2013, 13:11:18 »
http://chdk.setepontos.com/index.php?topic=9332.msg103516#msg103516

Your images have "amp glow" on the left hand side.   Experiment with exposure times and see what you like best?
Ported :   A1200    SD940   G10    Powershot N    G16

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Offline reyalp

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Re: Perseids Meteor Shower peaking August 11-13, 2013 - exposure time?
« Reply #2 on: 03 / August / 2013, 16:10:11 »
I'm not sure about using darkframes and whether it would be worth bothering with...and would it even work in a timelapse of a moving starfield (versus star trail) photography?
One way to do this is to shoot raw, and then create dark frames separately and apply them after the fact. This should also cut down the amp glow significantly. I used this approach in the image here http://chdk.setepontos.com/index.php?topic=10159.msg101969#msg101969
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