Some ISS shots

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Online reyalp

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Some ISS shots
« on: 24 / August / 2013, 15:40:53 »
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25 frame timelapse. 2 sec exposures, ISO 80, re-aimed by hand+eyeball while DNG was saving. This was an early evening pass, so the sky was still fairly bright.
youtu.be/Xx-GJoI6HRI

Attached:
2 minute exposure, ISO 80

These were all shot in dng and processed in raw therapee
Don't forget what the H stands for.

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Offline lapser

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Re: Some ISS shots
« Reply #1 on: 24 / August / 2013, 18:11:27 »
I love the 2 minute exposure. The ISS goes a long way in that time, doesn't it?

I've been fascinated with the ISS ever since I caught it accidentally on the edge of a sunset time lapse I was doing. I thought it was a police helicopter with a searchlight or something (I guess that would be called paranoia?). It went straight overhead and was really bright. My camera was pointed in the wrong direction for most of the pass, but it did catch it at the extreme left of the frame as it just came into view.

I looked up the ISS and found this web site:
http://www.heavens-above.com/
You can register your location, and then re-login every time. It has the times and directions of the ISS passes, as well as info about planets and other satellites. Anyway, I used it to predict where the ISS was going to be, and set up 3 cameras to catch it. It appeared on all 3.

I made a video beginning with the accidental ISS pass, and then showing all 3 cameras on the planned pass. Look to the extreme left where it starts to get dark a little above the horizon, at the start of the video. The ISS starts out going almost straight up.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rZJ1teTxUY#ws
EOS-M3_120f / SX50_100b / SX260_101a / G1X_100g / D20_100b
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrLapser/videos

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Offline lapser

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Re: Some ISS shots
« Reply #2 on: 25 / August / 2013, 02:18:31 »
You inspired me to try to catch the ISS tonight, even though it was a relatively dim, low elevation pass compared to some. Attached is a cropped, 3 second exposure taken with the SX50. I'll post the time lapses on the other thread tomorrow.
EOS-M3_120f / SX50_100b / SX260_101a / G1X_100g / D20_100b
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrLapser/videos

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Offline blackhole

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Re: Some ISS shots
« Reply #3 on: 25 / August / 2013, 03:21:49 »
Good images .
Here's one of my pictures on this theme. A little older, but shows the ISS and Space Shuttle Discovery in preparation for the joining,taken with the a590.


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Online reyalp

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Re: Some ISS shots
« Reply #4 on: 25 / August / 2013, 15:36:06 »
A couple more from last night (same pass, two cameras)

256 sec exposure. Unfortunately, the camera shifted so the stars have hooks on them.


64 stacked six second exposures (just stacked in gimp with "lighten only" and some half-assed jpeg dark frames). ISS only appears in about 13 of the frames, but I thought the longer star trails were more pleasing.  These were shot in continuous mode (no interval, just as fast as the cam would shoot)
A six second track is about 257 pixels. The gap is about 18. So the the delay between shots is about .42 seconds.



edit:
I use http://www.satflare.com/track.asp?q=25544#LIST to predict passes.
Don't forget what the H stands for.

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Offline lapser

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Re: Some ISS shots
« Reply #5 on: 25 / August / 2013, 16:39:56 »
Here's one of my pictures on this theme. A little older, but shows the ISS and Space Shuttle Discovery in preparation for the joining,taken with the a590.
That's amazing. It must have really been something to watch the two white dots moving across the sky so close together. Did you see the distance between them change while they were visible?
A six second track is about 257 pixels. The gap is about 18. So the the delay between shots is about .42 seconds.
edit:
I use http://www.satflare.com/track.asp?q=25544#LIST to predict passes.
Great website, thanks. The maps make it a lot easier to see what's happening.

My time lapse routines save the actual interval time. When I set the interval to 1 second, and manually set the shutter time to 1 second, the actual, measured interval is 1300 msec, which means the time between shots is 300 msec. This is on the SX260 in continuous mode. In single shot mode, the measured interval is 2050 msec, or 1050 msec between shots.

I used to think that night was the time when you pack up the cameras after the sunset is over. Apparently, a lot of interesting things happen at night too! Thanks for posting all the pics.
EOS-M3_120f / SX50_100b / SX260_101a / G1X_100g / D20_100b
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrLapser/videos

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Offline blackhole

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Re: Some ISS shots
« Reply #6 on: 26 / August / 2013, 04:21:38 »
Quote
That's amazing. It must have really been something to watch the two white dots moving across the sky so close together.
A better experience is when watching a triangle made of NOSS satellites. LiveLeak com Triangle UFOs and US Navy NOSS satellites
Quote
Did you see the distance between them change while they were visible?
No,duration of flyby is too short to see change in distance.This is only possible immediately after separation.
Otherwise to mention, this is a picture of STS 133 mission, the last mission when is used the Space Shuttle Discovery

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Online reyalp

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Re: Some ISS shots
« Reply #7 on: 09 / November / 2013, 16:48:39 »
Here's the other space station... China's Tiangong 1 (descending left to right, the trail that crosses it is an airplane)

Also, I'm not certain but I think the fuzzier "star trail" right of where the two cross is Andromeda.



elph130, 128 sec, iso400
« Last Edit: 09 / November / 2013, 18:24:59 by reyalp »
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Offline blackhole

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Re: Some ISS shots
« Reply #8 on: 09 / November / 2013, 17:45:12 »
You're right, it's the Andromeda galaxy.

 

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