Is it possible to see the outline of another photo when taking a photograph? - General Help and Assistance on using CHDK stable releases - CHDK Forum

Is it possible to see the outline of another photo when taking a photograph?

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I would like to see on the camera at the same time:
  - What the camera sees
  - Other selected my picture
This pictures should disappear by itself.

My goal is to make similar images in a different time of year.
If I had seen the preview yet "underneath" the previous image, it helped me to this task.
« Last Edit: 14 / September / 2013, 10:14:46 by pitoko »

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Offline srsa_4c

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I would like to see on the camera at the same time:
  - What the camera sees
  - Other selected my picture
This pictures should disappear by itself.
Not exactly what you want, but you may want to look at "edge overlay" in the manual: http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK_1.2.0_User_Manual

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Offline lapser

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I would like to see on the camera at the same time:
  - What the camera sees
  - Other selected my picture
This pictures should disappear by itself.

My goal is to make similar images in a different time of year.
If I had seen the preview yet "underneath" the previous image, it helped me to this task.
I really like that idea! You could kind of do it by switching between Play and Record mode. You'd look at your reference picture in Play mode, and try to match it in Record mode with the live image. It wouldn't be ideal, but you could probably get close enough to line up the images perfectly with Photoshop later.

A Lua script can draw lines on top of a picture that might work for you. You would put the reference picture on the screen in Play mode, then use the keys to draw lines between points on the reference picture for you to line up with, switch to Record mode and line up the live image with the lines you drew, which would still be on the screen.

Not exactly what you want, but you may want to look at "edge overlay" in the manual: http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK_1.2.0_User_Manual
That's a fantastic idea! How hard would it be to pick up the overlay part from the screen in play mode, and use it after switching to record mode? Maybe a "save edge overlay" script function or something?"
[EDIT]There's already a "Save Edge Overlay" menu option, I discovered. So the Edge Overlay will already do exactly what you're asking. Go for it.

[EDIT2]OK, I tried and it works perfectly. I love it when people implement my ideas before I even think of them!
« Last Edit: 14 / September / 2013, 11:15:34 by lapser »
EOS-M3_120f / SX50_100b / SX260_101a / G1X_100g / D20_100b
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrLapser/videos

I tried and it works perfectly.

After SDM 1.86 is released my first task will be to start removing features that I think are of little practical use.

That will include zebra, histogram and edge overlay.
Why edge overlay ?
Because it is FAR too crude.
I realised that this Spring with some before-and-after images of trees and woodland.
Instead, I simply made sure the 'before' image was on the SD card and I switched between that and LiveView.
Even that was VERY difficult, just moving the tripod-mounted camera a 100mm could change the overlap amongst the trees.



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Offline lapser

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After SDM 1.86 is released my first task will be to start removing features that I think are of little practical use.
I hardly ever use ANY of the CHDK menu features, so that would be OK for my purposes. My main problem is making sure everything is all turned off, so my scripts can run with a clear screen.

However, I accept that everyone is different and someone spent a lot of time and effort adding these features for a reason. The edge overlay, in particular, is designed for Panoramas, where you will be doing the fine alignment in software later. All the pictures are taken from a fixed point, including using a ring tripod mount so the pivot point is precise, if you're after perfection.

Your method of doing the fine alignment by switching between play and record mode sounds like the only way to do it perfectly for a scene with a lot of objects at different distances, like trees.

I wonder how hard it would be to add an option to save every other pixel of the display screen instead of the edge overlay? Then, you could see the live and previous images blended together.
EOS-M3_120f / SX50_100b / SX260_101a / G1X_100g / D20_100b
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrLapser/videos


I hardly ever use ANY of the CHDK menu features, so that would be OK for my purposes.
the idea is that SDM only supports a few key features.
That means less work for me and less confusion for people who are not 'power users'.
Everyone else can use CHDK.

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I wonder how hard it would be to add an option to save every other pixel of the display screen instead of the edge overlay? Then, you could see the live and previous images blended together.

I have not spent a lot of time looking at the code, and it is rather difficult to understand, but I think MagicLantern has that feature.

It seems to have found a solution - I took the "grid lines" function.

Purpose of this function is to draw the grid - but you can scratch the screen with rectangles of different colors.

I'm converting an image into a grid with shades of gray (CHDK color palette includes many transparent shades of gray).

Initially it works, but tomorrow I'll check it out on the outside.

PS: it seems that grid file cannot be too large - so (at least for now) i'm first resizing image to 180 x 120 resolution.

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Offline lapser

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I'm converting an image into a grid with shades of gray (CHDK color palette includes many transparent shades of gray).
Very creative solution. I like it.

The hard part will be lining up near objects with distant objects. The slightest inaccuracy in camera position changes the picture. For more info, Google: panorama parallax

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0HaRZi-FWs#
EOS-M3_120f / SX50_100b / SX260_101a / G1X_100g / D20_100b
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrLapser/videos


Although it does not make any practical difference, the method shown in the above movie does NOT find the nodal point, it finds the entrance pupil.

It is one of the great myths of photography that the nodal point is relevant to this type of panoramic photography, it is not.
In addition, there are two nodal points, the anterior and posterior.

Even the manufacturers of the 'Nodal Ninja' have incorrectly named their product.

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Offline lapser

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Although it does not make any practical difference, the method shown in the above movie does NOT find the nodal point, it finds the entrance pupil.
Good point  :)
EOS-M3_120f / SX50_100b / SX260_101a / G1X_100g / D20_100b
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrLapser/videos

 

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