Extended battery life for remote shooting

  • 5 Replies
  • 195 Views
*

Online Sdack

  • **
  • 59
Extended battery life for remote shooting
« on: 10 / November / 2017, 00:05:04 »
Advertisements
Hi folks,

Inspired by AHull's fascinating and diverse thread on the "quick waterproof case", which wanders deep into battery solution territory

https://chdk.setepontos.com/index.php?topic=10284.40

I've been assembling items for the remote battery solution of my dreams, for off grid, extended time-lapse.

The below item arrived from china last week and seems reasonably sturdy.. Sorry folks.. I'm not quite game for a teardown.. might not get it back together again!



ebay link here
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/121957836096

For batteries, having read of the overblown marketing claims for 18650 batteries on ebay, I decided to go with a local (ie. Australian), supplier and a brand name batteries which came up on special a couple of days ago..

Genuine LG HE4 2500mah 20A Lithium Rechargeable battery

https://www.techaroundyou.com/Vape-Batt ... upply-bulk

and a 6 slot charger to go with the 6 batteries

https://www.techaroundyou.com/Chargers/ ... CD-Charger

Total cost AUD $95, which seems a lot but the charger was $55 of that.  The batteries only cost $6.50 each.  I went for 'high drain' ones having read they're more capable. Even though there were some 2600mah 30A Sony's available for only a dollar more each.

https://www.techaroundyou.com/Genuine-V ... upply-bulk

I have just started looking at the microprocessor which I hope will be the master power supply for both the camera (Ixus 160) and a Raspberry Pi Zero W

https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-zero-w/

A tiny linux computer, which will controll the camera via CHDK-PTP, and then resize and upload the images as they are taken, to my webspace. 

With help from Manoweb and Reyalp, I've got a working version of the scripts to achieve this.  I'm only lacking the 3/4 G connection hardware to make this work away from a router with wireless.

Any suggestions would be most welcome on this project.  I'm keen to make sure the hardware and batteries don't suffer when the power gets low.  Hoping I can find a way to monitor the remaining charge remotely.
Best wishes
Sdack

Re: Extended battery life for remote shooting
« Reply #1 on: 10 / November / 2017, 03:03:36 »
ebay link here
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/121957836096

The 9V output looks interesting to power my g1x and EOS M3.
But not sure if the 9V/1.1A on startup time is enough.

I'm keen to make sure the hardware and batteries don't suffer when the power gets low.  Hoping I can find a way to monitor the remaining charge remotely.

That could be a problem when the cam goes off immediately.
Reply #4
https://chdk.setepontos.com/index.php?topic=13164.0


the camera (Ixus 160)
I would power the cam directly with the 18650 cells. Then the power goes slowly down.
EOS M3 101a, 2*G1x (101a,100e), S110 (103a), SX50 (100c), SX230 (101a), IXUS160 (100a), IXUS30 (100k), 2*S45,
Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums
YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrTH0tHy9OYTVDzWIvXEMlw/videos?shelf_id=0&view=0&sort=dd

Re: Extended battery life for remote shooting
« Reply #2 on: 10 / November / 2017, 20:33:13 »
"...I've been assembling items for the remote battery solution of my dreams, for off grid, extended time-lapse..."

Any suggestions would be most welcome on this project.  I'm keen to make sure the hardware and batteries don't suffer when the power gets low.  Hoping I can find a way to monitor the remaining charge remotely.
Ref #1:-  Reply #1  by c_joerg
"...
I would power the cam directly with the 18650 cells. Then the power goes slowly down..."
"...But not sure if the 9V/1.1A on start-up time is enough...."

That is what I would also do. Some additional stuff to consider (i.e. camera don't suffer):-

a/ System reliability, powering the camera directly of a battery (parallel bank) will have a greater
    peak current (reserve) capacity.   i.e. The Camera could, at times, draw peak currents, beyond
    the ability of the inbuilt voltage converter stated  specification.

b/ When a Camera "peak current event" occurs on a camera with direct battery power the lower
    internal resistance of the direct battery power supply results in only a very small drop in the
     cameras supply voltage.

c/  When a Camera "peak current event" occurs on a camera with converter battery power the higher
     internal resistance of the converter battery power supply results in a higher drop in the
     cameras supply voltage.

d/ As demonstrated by "Bug Splatter" in the "a560 Camera Battery and Current Measurements".
    here  https://chdk.setepontos.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=12334.0;attach=11946
    The camera's, internal power management, attempts to to compensate when a "peak current event"
    occurs (which then results in a sudden camera supply voltage drop) by then drawing additional
    current. With the lower internal resistance of the direct battery power supply there is no problem
    until the direct battery are almost flat.  i.e a controlled camera power down.

c/ With a converter battery power supply, when a Camera "peak current event" occurs, on a camera
    there is a MUCH greater probability of a  UN-controlled camera power down.

d/ The above stuff is the basic reason for random  UN-controlled camera power down issues with
    cameras powered via cheap Chinese Mains supplied battery adapters.
    i.e. "High Internal Resistance" and "NO" additional filtering components.

H-H

Ref #2:- Using chdk to measure the internal resistance of the batteries in the camera
             15/November/2008 by Bagger288

Edit #1 Also some time ago someone constructed a (portable) CHDK 8 camera panoramic (legacy) array that
             was powered from a 12 lead acid battery with a DIY converter and a voltage regulator.
            Because of the rig's poor wiring and construction the voltage regulator failed and 12 volts was then
            feed to a 8 cameras which then failed.
           
An additional issue, in this post, is the voltage adjustment switch, which could be inadvertently be set to the wrong voltage.
             
« Last Edit: 10 / November / 2017, 21:44:49 by Hardware_Hacker »

*

Online Sdack

  • **
  • 59
Re: Extended battery life for remote shooting
« Reply #3 on: 11 / November / 2017, 03:15:55 »
Thanks heaps for your detailed input..

When you say "converter battery".. do you mean one of these, what I call dummy batteries?



https://www.ebay.com/itm/302417801125

And do I understand correctly that something you call a "peak current event" might not be able to pull enough current through a cheap device as shown above?

The USB power pack I have received, has six 18650 batteries, I believe wired in parallel, which must then go through some kind of (probably cheap as possible) step up regulator, to achieve 5volt output from 3.7 volt cells.

I guess, if I find my cameras shutting down unexpectedly, then this is likely one of the 'usual suspects'.

Would you recommend going for the genuine Canon AC adaptor, for it's superior construction?

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ac-adapter-kit-ack-dc90

Best wishes
Sdack



Re: Extended battery life for remote shooting
« Reply #4 on: 11 / November / 2017, 09:15:11 »
And do I understand correctly that something you call a "peak current event" might not be able to pull enough current through a cheap device as shown above?
AFAIK, H-H's comment was about an external power supply not being able to provide enough peak current.  As long as your cheap device fits correctly into your camera, it should not have an issue with peak current.
Ported : A1200  SD940  G10  Powershot N  G16*

*

Online Sdack

  • **
  • 59
Re: Extended battery life for remote shooting
« Reply #5 on: 11 / November / 2017, 16:08:55 »
That makes sense in the context of mains adaptors but my post was all about about batteries..

Perhaps he will clarify further.

It turns out that another CHDK member, AHull, who's STM32 microprossesor based project, Sunset Timer I'm seeking to duplicate, also has the ability to read the charge of the batteries and therefore offers the safety I need for the Raspberry Pi and camera.  Even if the camera can shutdown on low voltage, I don't want to be supplying a hit of 'almost enough' power every ten minutes for hours or possibly days before I can get out to it.

It's also more than likely the Raspberry Pi could upload a snapshot of battery state too when it uploads the images, so I will know what's going on at a distance.  If it weren't for the internet connectivity of my project, I don't think I would be game to leave a camera unattended for days and weeks.  It would be like going back to cellulose film again..  I'm old enough to remember waiting weeks for rolls of holiday film to arrive in the post, only to be disappointed by entire rolls being ruined due to overexposure or some other error.

I was tempted to suggest that I am too lazy and coddled by the digital age, expecting instant results delivered to my desktop but I am putting a lot more effort into developing this project than my parents did into their holiday snaps.

S


 

Related Topics