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CHDK for longtime timelapse

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Offline c_joerg

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Re: CHDK for longtime timelapse
« Reply #50 on: 29 / August / 2021, 03:52:41 »
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I think it is not so interesting, because in the time lapse I do the clouds/sky is the most interesting part and in that video it is overexposed.

The video is definitely overexposed in many places.

That is precisely the great advantage of rawopint that you can limit the overexposure there. I go to a maximum of 1%, rather lower.

However, the measurement takes place on the RAW data and that says nothing about how big the overexposure is in the JPG.
If you want to use the full dynamics then you have to  use RAW.
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Re: CHDK for longtime timelapse
« Reply #51 on: 29 / August / 2021, 07:28:03 »

However, the measurement takes place on the RAW data and that says nothing about how big the overexposure is in the JPG.


Yeah, that's a good point!
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Offline reyalp

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Re: CHDK for longtime timelapse
« Reply #52 on: 29 / August / 2021, 17:47:08 »
However, the measurement takes place on the RAW data and that says nothing about how big the overexposure is in the JPG.
We don't know the exact details, but as far as I remember, when rawopint successfully keeps raw exposure below the default 1/4 stop margin, the jpegs generally aren't heavily blown out.

It is possible that g1x behaves differently since it has 14 bit raw rather than the more common 12 bit.
Don't forget what the H stands for.

 

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