Turning the camera on or off using USB and CHDK? Gphoto2 Webcam Remote Capture - Creative Uses of CHDK - CHDK Forum

Turning the camera on or off using USB and CHDK? Gphoto2 Webcam Remote Capture

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Hi,

I am using Gphoto2 to remote capture with a canon cam, it works great. The problem I have is that the camera is in a remote location and sometimes power is cut, so I lose the control and have to manually turn it back on .. which is a pain.

I would jump up and down with joy if someone could tell me that you can turn on or off the camera via USB using CHDK or something else.
Any ideas if someone has done this? or this could be done? or how one might do this?

thanks,

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databoy

Very simple. If you are running from a mains supply, use a small UPS.

You can also use a mains rated relay to switch on the camera via the USB remote cable.

If you do not have any electronics experience buy yourself a small UPS; it will be a lot cheaper than paying someone to make up the mains relay device.

The alternative is to make up an external rechargeable battery pack.

Have a look at this site for ideas:

ePanorama.net

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Offline fbonomi

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  • A570IS SD1100/Ixus80
    • Francesco Bonomi
I would jump up and down with joy if someone could tell me that you can turn on or off the camera via USB using CHDK or something else.

well, certain cameras have a "wake-up on USB signal" which should help.

See the last column of this page:
CameraFeatures - CHDK Wiki

I have seen that page with wake up details. Is it reasonable to think that most of those cameras with <?> beside that column will do it .. or is this not a widely adopted feature?

Thanks for the help!


Perhaps the Canon IXUS 80 IS / SD1100 IS or IXUS960IS could have the USB wakeup - what are the chances do you think?

Those seem to be the 2 best cameras for my application.

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Offline fbonomi

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  • A570IS SD1100/Ixus80
    • Francesco Bonomi
I wouldn't give it for granted.

you could try and asking someone here to test a particular model (all it takes it to hook the camerta to the PC while powered off)

Good idea, would someone please be able to test the IXUS 80 IS or IXUS960IS whether or not they will power up from an off state with USB?

Thanks!

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databoy

An alternative way for the people who do not have a wake up on the USB cable is to make a camera bracket and use small model railway, boat or plane actuators. Even pin ball machine parts will work. A few years ago a guy posted photos of a camera rig used for photographing wildlife. All he used was an L bracket with small solenoids. One was to switch the camera on and off and the other was for the shutter release.

Most of the modelling guys use off the shelf parts and kits. I do not have the web page or the URL. A visit to modelling and pinball building sites on the net may help. If you are using a mains to 6 volt supply, you can splice another cable into the 6 volt supply and use some 555 trigger circuits to activate the solenoids.

The KAP guys have some interesting rigs. Try posting the question at:
KAP Discussion Page - All Discussions

Someone my have a ready to build design.

This remote control site may be a starting point:

Electronic Gadgets for Radio Control, by VA3AVR

 
« Last Edit: 03 / October / 2008, 07:06:08 by databoy »


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Offline fudgey

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Canon's built-in USB remote capture capability and wakeup from USB feature somewhat go hand in hand and most of the recent models don't have them. This is something they've decided to remove from at least the small and/or inexpensive camera range feature set.

Sorry to resurrect this thread, but I thought I'd pass on this tip for others faced with the same problem.

There's one easy way to solve this which works with most canon cameras: disconnect the power supply and force the power button down by some means (A cable tie and some small object over the power button should suffice).

When power is reapplied the camera will notice the power switch is pressed and will power up. Because the state of the power button never changes, the camera doesn't power down.

 

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