Help ~ making an external power adaptor - page 2 - Hotwire! Hardware Mods, Accessories and Insights - CHDK Forum supplierdeeply

Help ~ making an external power adaptor

  • 13 Replies
  • 5634 Views
Re: Help ~ making an external power adaptor
« Reply #10 on: 16 / November / 2011, 13:02:38 »
Advertisements
Be aware that the USA, Canada, EU countries and Australia have all released safety bulletins regarding purchasing mains power supplies on eBay.

An electrical audit found that most of the cheap 110 volt power supplies sold on eBay for almost free are fakes prone to catching on fire. Certified power supplies are built from certified fire retardant plastics and carry an electrical certification number.

The advice is to ask for the electrical certification number and verify that the power supply is genuine before purchasing mains electrical equipment from eBay.

Hence me building one.
~ooooooo what does this button do? ~ NOOO DEEDEE ~ *le explosion

Re: Help ~ making an external power adaptor
« Reply #11 on: 17 / November / 2011, 04:46:25 »
The idea behind using AC power adapter, at least for most people, is to provide rock solid/stable/safe power supply for your studio camera setup in the first place. Unless you have equipped shop for playing with quality electronic parts, e.g. experienced geeks building their own fine power amplifiers, chances are you won't endup with comparable product with the official (overpriced) AC adapter or even the ebay one. I just don't see the benefits here, wouldn't be more fruitfull option to seek and identify the best quality 3rd party manufacturer among that "bad ebay" pool?

Re: Help ~ making an external power adaptor
« Reply #12 on: 17 / November / 2011, 08:08:17 »
Elliott Sound Products (ESP) in Australia have posted some interesting articles on the web site:

http://sound.westhost.com/counterfeit.htm
http://sound.westhost.com/articles.htm
http://sound.westhost.com/articles/50-60hz.htm
http://sound.westhost.com/articles/inrush.htm
http://sound.westhost.com/psu-wiring.htm

Building low voltage power supplies is an art. Many of the common linear regulators available from hobby shops will function in under 5 volt voltage power supplies. When read in conjunction with the manufacturer’s specifications, those regulators are really operating at their voltage limitations and may not deliver the full rated current.

I have a number of under 5 volt power supplies salvaged from laptops and mobile phone equipment. The mains supply is a switched mode power supply. The regulator used in the secondary low voltage side is a specialised under 5 volt voltage regulator not available to hobbyists. The low voltage side contains an opto feedback to the mains switched mode regulator. The combination of both produces the compact power supplies we see advertised on manufacturer’s sites.

There is nothing wrong with third party power supplies obtained from a legitimate source. In some cases they are identical in design to the original. In fact most manufacturers use a certified OEM manufacturer to manufacture their power supplies.

In my region, Australia, Liteon branded switched mode power supplies are commonly supplied with manufacturer branded laptops and notebooks. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lite-On

Where the problem arises is counterfeited electronic components and power supplies. Most are manufactured in China and replicate genuine power supplies down to the certification labels. They are always sold on eBay at almost give away prices.

The problem with counterfeited electronic components is that they will perform the job for a limited time. Considering there is no warranty on the product, that cheap power supply can work out to be an expensive long term investment.

There are plenty of posts on this forum regarding people asking for help building a power supply. No offence intended; the days of building hobby equipment is defunct. There is no way that a hobbyist can design and build a linear or switched mode power supply comparable to the genuine manufacturer’s product. Even if you can purchase the correct components, in most cases the cost of the components is more than purchasing a ready built product. 

Most forums are international. The only reliable way to determine whether a power supply is genuine and suitable for your region is to ask a forum member who lives in the same region.

Re: Help ~ making an external power adaptor
« Reply #13 on: 17 / November / 2011, 22:29:57 »
Well I finished building an ATX power spliter that is now happily powering my camera. :D
I'll post the time lapse and the pictures of the build tomorow.

Ironicily I spent almost as much in parts as if I had just forked out the cash for a real power supply. DO'H
Least mine can be repaired easily and has more than one purpose (3.3V out, 5v out, 12v out)

EDIT: here it is http://www.instructables.com/id/ATX-power-supply-in-a-cd-drive-case/
« Last Edit: 18 / November / 2011, 11:22:07 by marsrover »
~ooooooo what does this button do? ~ NOOO DEEDEE ~ *le explosion


 

Related Topics