Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again) - page 2 - Creative Uses of CHDK - CHDK Forum

Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)

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Offline PhyrePhoX

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Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #10 on: 12 / April / 2008, 10:11:22 »
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didnt feel like opening a new thread, since this is the same topic:
finally got around to testing my s3is regarding it's "highspeed".
this is the result, i think there are a few keepers in there. actually i'd like to print a few of those in high resolution.hm.
attached is a small picture and a picture of the setup - a bathtub, a what we call in germany a cheap "construction site light" and my 20 year old flash attached to the gorillapod on the rim of the bathtub.
for a higher resolution image you can go here: zSHARE - drops.jpg 1,5MB with a whopping resolution of 6000 to 4xxx.
Problems that did arise: bathroom looks like [admin: avoid swearing please] now, so does the cam (used skylight filter in front of it though :D). next time: careful preparation of workspace. also i only used the cams built in timer, this was the reason i have a lot of dark pics - the slave flash wasnt ready yet and the cam took pics at a much too fast rate. so next time: either scripting or my enhanced laser-motiondetection-remoteUSB-thingy.
also: i still havent found a way to produce high quality "drops". today i used a watering can, which, to be honest, sucked badly. also i still have to figure out all the settings on my slave flash, lighting could have been way better.

edit: speed: 1/10.000 sec, aperture 8.0, no raw

Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #11 on: 12 / April / 2008, 10:15:58 »
How do you time the shutter release to when the drops hit the water surface? I've tried using continous shooting, but my S5 seems to be quite slow because not many pictures actually score a hit. I've also been trying MD scripts but none seems to detect the water drop.

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Offline PhyrePhoX

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Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #12 on: 12 / April / 2008, 10:21:07 »
md detect is much too slow for water drops (at least as of now, before dataghost optimized it :D). actually i can't time it, it is a matter of luck & patience. start the cam with a script so that it shoots like every 10 seconds or shorter, depends if you use external flash or not. then start the dripping. you can automate this by adjusting the water tap so that a drop will squeeze out like once in a second. then after a few minutes or hours you surely will have a few keepers. Thats the way Stevo did it, see first post.

Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #13 on: 12 / April / 2008, 10:22:22 »
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« Last Edit: 22 / April / 2008, 16:07:52 by Barney Fife »
[acseven/admin commented out: please refrain from more direct offensive language to any user. FW complaints to me] I felt it imperative to withdraw my TOTAL participation. Nobody has my permission, nor the right, to reinstate MY posts. Make-do with my quoted text in others' replies only. Bye


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Offline PhyrePhoX

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Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #14 on: 12 / April / 2008, 10:43:33 »
originally i had in mind to use my macro lens, but a) it was VERY hard focusing and b) DOF is so shallow, i would have needed much luck to get a drop in focus. actually it took me 1 hour with setup and cleaning up and also finding out how PS3 will fit all these pics into one. so yes, in a more "professional" lab one could do amazing shots - with a cheap P&S cam. thanks for your info & tips, will definitly try these out one day.

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Offline ISO64

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Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #15 on: 12 / April / 2008, 17:07:15 »
With a bit of luck, and a lot of patience, my water drop frozen in time. Faucet was dripping very slowly from about 40 cm above the surface of the water. I was running an Canon intervalometer at about 15 s between shots and managed to get the drops to fall at a rate sligtlu longer that interval. Started camera 2 s before the drop was to fall and over a sequence of 10 images 3-4 would show nice splash. Proof is in the pudding:


Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #16 on: 12 / April / 2008, 18:58:30 »
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« Last Edit: 22 / April / 2008, 16:08:20 by Barney Fife »
[acseven/admin commented out: please refrain from more direct offensive language to any user. FW complaints to me] I felt it imperative to withdraw my TOTAL participation. Nobody has my permission, nor the right, to reinstate MY posts. Make-do with my quoted text in others' replies only. Bye

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Offline ISO64

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Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #17 on: 12 / April / 2008, 20:24:37 »
This is a beginner's mistake. When I look at photos with calm water surface, before the drop, S3 was focusing on the point of largest contrast, in this case, on the raised text on the botom of the glass caserole. Water was not deep enough to notice out-of-focus image immediately. Will repeat the shots some time soon, hoping for better photos.

Still better thousand times than when I tried to focus on and frame a hummingbird flying around fruit juice pitcher on patio table :haha


Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #18 on: 15 / April / 2008, 15:46:20 »
What is better to use in high-speed fotography, normal flash or slow syncro, and if slow syncro what curtain. Another question is regarding the exposure time, i've been watching the websites of some artists specialised on water drops, and one of them said he was using a long exposure time, 3-4s and then triggering a flash to "freeze the drop", wouldn't that ruin the photograph by overexposure?

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Offline fudgey

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Re: Water Drips Frozen in Time (Again)
« Reply #19 on: 15 / April / 2008, 16:05:47 »
What is better to use in high-speed fotography, normal flash or slow syncro, and if slow syncro what curtain. Another question is regarding the exposure time, i've been watching the websites of some artists specialised on water drops, and one of them said he was using a long exposure time, 3-4s and then triggering a flash to "freeze the drop", wouldn't that ruin the photograph by overexposure?

Why would it? I'm assuming he shoots in dark. It's the amount of light that matters, not if it comes in a short bright burst or steadily over the entire exposure.

What's great about CHDK and these tiny inexpensive cameras with lightning fast electronic shutters is that we don't have to use the flash to freeze our drops. We can just set the shutter to work faster than most flash units and make sure there's enough light. Of course the flash can be used to ensure there is enough light, but the freezing part of the job can be done by a short shutter time. No need to shoot in dark.

There are no curtains in these cameras.

 

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