Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.) - General Chat - CHDK Forum

Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)

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Offline GrAnd

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("set" is both the past-tense and present tense of the verb "set", a weird english thing. But if you sit now, then you sat down in the past. Or you could just set yourself down. But if you sat down two times, that could be considered a set of sats. :D English is weird. :D )
:lol
I'm still trying to study all these funny things. But it seems that this process is endless. :D
BTW, In russian there is similar fun with wording. :)
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Offline Kalli

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Re: Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)
« Reply #1 on: 15 / December / 2007, 18:33:14 »
("set" is both the past-tense and present tense of the verb "set", a weird english thing. But if you sit now, then you sat down in the past. Or you could just set yourself down. But if you sat down two times, that could be considered a set of sats. :D English is weird. :D )

correction: a set of sits

Hi,
I'm urged to add my two cents:
Thist is a correct (but confusing) german sentence:

Wenn hinter Fliegen Fliegen fliegen, fliegen Fliegen Fliegen hinterher.

Cheers!

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Offline Kalli

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Re: Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)
« Reply #2 on: 15 / December / 2007, 18:53:02 »
Well I will try to translate (in bad english...):

When behind flies flies (are) flying, than flies (are) flying behind flies.

Fliegen (flies) fliegen (are flying)... however it's correct (but nonsense).

Cheers

Re: Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)
« Reply #3 on: 15 / December / 2007, 23:53:28 »
So it's Latin now?
A more correct translation may be:
I'd rather be in an apple tree, than a bad man in adversity. or

The first malo is the first person singular present active indicative form of the verb malo, malle, malui, prefer, rather. The second
word comes from malus, -i, which means apple tree. It's form is ablative, specifically "ablative of place where." The third malo comes from the masculine form of the adjective malus, -a, -um, which means bad. Used without a noun, it becomes a substantive, usually understood to mean a bad man. It's in the ablative case, which is also used to express the second half of a statement of preference (e.g. I would rather be this than that). The last word comes from the neuter form as the same adjective as the third malo, and as a neuter substantive, it means something like in a bad way or in a bad situation. It is in the ablative case again, in a situation that is linguistically similar to the ablative of place where above.

This analisys is NOT the result of scholarship, rather research.

Persevera, per severa, per se vera.







« Last Edit: 16 / December / 2007, 01:13:35 by ke7doy »


Re: Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)
« Reply #4 on: 16 / December / 2007, 00:08:04 »
Loosley translated into better english, using fliegen in the sense of "aviation".
When a pilot is flying behind another plane, a flyer behind a flyer flies.

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Offline GrAnd

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Re: Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)
« Reply #5 on: 16 / December / 2007, 03:48:16 »
So, we need "Offtopic" sub-forum... ;)

As this forum prohibits using of any non-latin characters, I have to write in translit:
"Kosil kosoy kosoy kosoy." :D
The first word is "to mow down" in the past tense.
The rest three - "cross-eyed" or "skew" (adj); "scythe" (noun); "rabbit" (noun).
So, it means: "A cross-eyed rabbit mowed down by scythe." Or it doesn't? It could mean: "A rabbit mowed down by skewed scythe."  :D
Also in russian you can mix these three last words in almost any way. So, for example, you can't definitely say which of words "kosoy" means "rabbit". It can be any, depends on inflexion of speaker and imagination of listener. :)
« Last Edit: 16 / December / 2007, 03:54:22 by GrAnd »
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Re: Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)
« Reply #6 on: 17 / December / 2007, 07:42:53 »
"set" is both the past-tense and present tense of the verb "set"
Hi, Barney!
Thank u for your remarks! subsequent talk was very impressive :))

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Offline GrAnd

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Re: Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)
« Reply #7 on: 17 / December / 2007, 07:49:34 »
(My only regret is that my mind could never grasp more than 1 language, and poorly at that. I took 2 yrs of French, 2 years of Latin, and I'd be lucky to tell you that "rodent" means "they gnaw" in Latin (from "rodere": "to gnaw". one of the few I remember because it is what it says :)), or I could ask you if it's cold outside with "Il fait froid?" 4 years of study, shot to hell, wasted on me.  :blink::D :-X  I'm highly envious of your linguistic skills, to say the least.)

It's normal situation if you do not have a motivation to study a language. And it is very important to practice regularly. In other case it could just waste of time.
I studied English in regular school more than 4 years. But after that I had studied just the alphabet, I would say. :) Because, in the USSR in that time there was no usage of English language. All goods were made domestically. No international films, no satellite TV, no Internet yet. So, no other languages were needed to know, except Russian.
Then, I fell in love with... a computer. :D I had to read a lot of manuals and programming references. But it helped to study just technical words. I absolutely did not bother about form and tenses of sentences because they are unnecessary for reading manuals.Three years ago I changed the company I work for. Since that I have had to learn English, because in my current job I have a lot of email conversations and phone meetings with colleagues from other countries everyday.
So, I could say that I study English just 3 years (2 hours per week). And now I'm trying catching any chance to practice in it.

If I had had English language as my mother tongue I would have hardly imagined to study an another one. :)
« Last Edit: 17 / December / 2007, 07:54:25 by GrAnd »
CHDK Developer.


Re: Interesting Language Discussion (English, German, Russian, Finnish, etc.)
« Reply #8 on: 18 / December / 2007, 15:52:28 »
(My only regret is that my mind could never grasp more than 1 language, and poorly at that. I took 2 yrs of French, 2 years of Latin, and I'd be lucky to tell you that "rodent" means "they gnaw" in Latin (from "rodere": "to gnaw". one of the few I remember because it is what it says :)), or I could ask you if it's cold outside with "Il fait froid?" 4 years of study, shot to hell, wasted on me.  :blink::D :-X  I'm highly envious of your linguistic skills, to say the least.)

It's normal situation if you do not have a motivation to study a language. And it is very important to practice regularly. In other case it could just waste of time.
I studied English in regular school more than 4 years. But after that I had studied just the alphabet, I would say. :) Because, in the USSR in that time there was no usage of English language. All goods were made domestically. No international films, no satellite TV, no Internet yet. So, no other languages were needed to know, except Russian.
Then, I fell in love with... a computer. :D I had to read a lot of manuals and programming references. But it helped to study just technical words. I absolutely did not bother about form and tenses of sentences because they are unnecessary for reading manuals.Three years ago I changed the company I work for. Since that I have had to learn English, because in my current job I have a lot of email conversations and phone meetings with colleagues from other countries everyday.
So, I could say that I study English just 3 years (2 hours per week). And now I'm trying catching any chance to practice in it.

If I had had English language as my mother tongue I would have hardly imagined to study an another one. :)

As english speakers we also often take for granted how easily we tend to interpret english slang which may come out as confusing to people just learning english.  In university had a guy who always like to use the phrase "big time" as in: "did you go out drinking last night? "Big time!"  finally one of our non-english friends had to ask "What is this 'big time' your always speaking of?"

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Offline ewavr

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EWAVR also claimed, that he do not speak English at all. But after a month he joined us in a discussion on this forum. Either he studied English for a month, or ...  ::)

I learned some English words while reading the technical documentation + translate.google.com  ;)
In school and the institute, I taught German.

BTW. I also insist that my English is very ugly and simple, despite Barney's lessons...  :D

Unfortunately, I cannot understand any of his posts  :'(
« Last Edit: 03 / April / 2008, 16:29:49 by ewavr »

 

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