Ultimate Intervalometer - a script for shooting over a long duration - v4.8

  • 528 Replies
  • 51727 Views
*

Offline ahull

  • *****
  • 634
Advertisements
Another trick (which works better in some situations than others) is to use dessicant bags

They wont work quite so well if the container you are using is open to the elements, they work best in small enclosed environments.

These require zero battery power, and in most cases can be reused if you are careful.

Naturally they have no effect on condensation on the *outside* of the container  ;).
« Last Edit: 08 / June / 2013, 16:38:07 by ahull »

They wont work quite so well if the container you are using is open to the elements, they work best in small enclosed environments.
You actually need a sealed container for this to work - otherwise all the moisture the dessicant absorbs will be replaced by more moisture from the atmosphere.

Quote
Naturally they have no effect on condensation on the *outside* of the container  ;).
As some point I would like to figure out how blackhole gets condensation on a warm surface.  I'm missing something here.
Ported :   A1200    SD940   G10    Powershot N    G16

*

Offline ahull

  • *****
  • 634
Naturally they have no effect on condensation on the *outside* of the container  ;).
As some point I would like to figure out how blackhole gets condensation on a warm surface.  I'm missing something here.

Waterwingz - I just read this as a result of your previous comment... Sadly, as a result I am none the wiser :blink:

Waterwingz - I just read this as a result of your previous comment... Sadly, as a result I am none the wiser :blink:
I'm sure blackhole will find that amusing though.
Ported :   A1200    SD940   G10    Powershot N    G16


*

Offline ahull

  • *****
  • 634
I think I "over thought" the problem somewhat :P.

*

Offline bwh13

  • *
  • 28
Hi All,
I'm having what I would call 'pretty good success' with v1.7 and my solar charging rig.  I will post some pics of the setup when it's a bit more refined.

Waterwingz: thanks for putting the voltage parameter into the output log.  It's been very helpful in troubleshooting some of the issues I've had with the solar battery charger.

I have a question for you extremely tech folks out there, but first some of the assumptions that I'm operating under: the battery is nominally 3.7v; my AC to DC charger for my SD1000 puts out 4.3v.  Some of the battery voltages that were being written to the output log were 4.5v and one said 5.8v!  The script shut the camera down after that (I'm assuming it was the script, but maybe there is some over-current logic in the camera...?  (that's one question I have, I suppose.)

This seems like it's a problem with the solar charger allowing that voltage spike through.  I'm running the camera and script now (it's overcast with little to no direct sun on my solar panel) and the setup seems to be running well at 1 minute intervals.

My second question might be that I noticed in the CHDK settings you could set a high and low voltage.  I'm guessing that this would not override any over-current logic or circuit.  Would this be a bad idea to go messing with in light of the fact that I logged a 5.8v spike that (likely) shut my system down?

Thanks in advance!

I'm having what I would call 'pretty good success' with v1.7 and my solar charging rig.  I will post some pics of the setup when it's a bit more refined.
Excellent news - thanks for sharing that!

Quote
I have a question for you extremely tech folks out there, but first some of the assumptions that I'm operating under: the battery is nominally 3.7v; my AC to DC charger for my SD1000 puts out 4.3v. 
That's crowding things on the upper side of the voltage range - almost 20% high is a lot.

Quote
Some of the battery voltages that were being written to the output log were 4.5v and one said 5.8v! 
Ouch.

Quote
The script shut the camera down after that (I'm assuming it was the script, but maybe there is some over-current logic in the camera...?  (that's one question I have, I suppose.)
The script doesn't care about the voltage - it just records it.  I did considered adding a "low voltage shutdown" setting at one time but didn't see any value in that - the camera will shut itself down without help from the script.  So if your camera is seeing 5.8V spikes,  it could be shutting down on its own.

Quote
This seems like it's a problem with the solar charger allowing that voltage spike through.  I'm running the camera and script now (it's overcast with little to no direct sun on my solar panel) and the setup seems to be running well at 1 minute intervals.
The current draw from the camera swings quite a bit while it is shooting - over 300% between shooting and idle.  Its possible your voltage regulator can't keep up and overshoots.  I'd think about an overvoltage protection circuit just ahead of the camera if I was you.  Some simple lile a zener that blows a fuse or perhaps something better.

Quote
My second question might be that I noticed in the CHDK settings you could set a high and low voltage.  I'm guessing that this would not override any over-current logic or circuit. 
Those settings just tell CHDK what values to use for 0% and 100% when displaying battery status as percent rather than voltage.

Quote
Would this be a bad idea to go messing with in light of the fact that I logged a 5.8v spike that (likely) shut my system down?
Won't make any difference.

Ported :   A1200    SD940   G10    Powershot N    G16

can there be code running between shutter releases, and can the intervals be 200-600ms?


*

Offline ahull

  • *****
  • 634
I have a question for you extremely tech folks out there, but first some of the assumptions that I'm operating under: the battery is nominally 3.7v; my AC to DC charger for my SD1000 puts out 4.3v.

If you are attempting to charge a LiPo battery, it can be a *very* bad idea to use too high a voltage, LiPo batteries are liable to thermal runaway if the voltage goes too high, we are talking a lot of magic smoke and much flame here (see this topic for more details).

Some of the battery voltages that were being written to the output log were 4.5v and one said 5.8v!  The script shut the camera down after that (I'm assuming it was the script, but maybe there is some over-current logic in the camera...?  (that's one question I have, I suppose.)

The camera may do much worse than shut down, it may "crowbar" the power supply to pop the battery fuse, so take extreme care with this.  There is certainly some circuitry and logic involved that looks capable of this, I have never tried to see if my hunch about its function is correct, nor do I know what voltage would cause this, but be assured it would probably be not much more than 5.8V.

There are certain strings in the firmware that suggest the camera does indeed worry about voltages here are some examples (from the Ixus Wireless firmware).. BatVoltageToAd - LATCH_E3:VoltageDrop - LATCH_E21:VoltageDrop - LATCH_E2:VoltageDrop - SetInputVoltage - so in all probability the Digic in the camera does react to voltage problems, most probably by shutting down. The DC controller circuitry may however have other ideas about what to do, or may simply fry if the voltage exceeds certain thresholds.
« Last Edit: 18 / July / 2013, 17:11:49 by ahull »

can there be code running between shutter releases,
Yes.
Quote
and can the intervals be 200-600ms?
Yes.   But bear in mind that while the interval between the end of one shot and the start of the next shot can be that short,  the actual shot will typically take from one to two seconds to complete.
Ported :   A1200    SD940   G10    Powershot N    G16

 

Related Topics